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Phonics

phonics

In Key Stage One, children are taught synthetic phonics through 20 minute, daily sessions in groups which are streamed according to the Letters and Sounds phase in which they are working in.  At Heath Fields Primary, we use the Bug Club programme which gives children a firm, fun foundation in phonics with a complete phonics programme that's proven to raise reading standards.  We apply and consolidate the sounds learnt in phonics through reading in class using Phonics Bug books and e-books which are fully decodable as well as banded guided reading books which promote a school culture of reading for pleasure.

Bug Club

Click here for a helpful link to show how pure sounds are made.

 

rapidphonics

Those children in Key Stage Two who require additional phonics teaching follow the Rapid Phonics catch-up problem designed for struggling readers, EAL readers and readers with SEN or dyslexia.      

reading clipart

At Heath Fields, our home readers are levelled from wordless books up to level 5 readers so that children are able to enjoy books at home which are well-matched to their needs.  Children are able to choose from a broad range of books from a wide selection of celebrated authors as well as reading schemes such as Project X, Bug Club and Oxford Reading Tree.   

 

At Heath Fields, our home readers are levelled from wordless books up to level 5 readers so that children are able to enjoy books at home which are well-matched to their needs.  Children are able to choose from a broad range of books from a wide selection of celebrated authors as well as reading schemes such as Project X, Bug Club and Oxford Reading Tree.   

In Phase 2, letters and their sounds are introduced one at a time. A set of letters is taught each week, in the following sequence:

Set 1: s, a, t, p
Set 2: i, n, m, d
Set 3: g, o, c, k
Set 4: ck, e, u, r
Set 5: h, b, f, ff, l, ll, ss

As soon as each set of letters is introduced, children will be encouraged to use their knowledge of the letter sounds to blend and sound out words. For example, They will learn to blend the sounds s-a-t to make the word sat. They will also start learning to segment words.

 

By the time they reach Phase 3, children will already be able to blend and segment words containing the 19 letters taught in Phase 2.

Over the twelve weeks which Phase 3 is expected to last, twenty-five new graphemes are introduced (one at a time).

Set 6: j, v, w, x

Set 7: y, z, zz, qu

Consonant digraphs: ch, sh, th, ng

Vowel digraphs: ai, ee, igh, oa, oo, ar, or, ur, ow, oi, ear, air, ure, er

 

When children start Phase Four of the Letters and Sounds phonics programme, they will know a grapheme for each of the 42 phonemes. They will be able to blend phonemes to read CVC (consonant-vowel-consonant) words and segment in order to spell them.

Children will also have begun reading straightforward two-syllable words and simple captions, as well as reading and spelling some tricky words.

In Phase 4, no new graphemes are introduced. The main aim of this phase is to consolidate the children's knowledge and to help them learn to read and spell words which have adjacent consonants, such as trap, string and milk.

 


 

Children entering Phase Five will already be able to read and spell words with adjacent consonants, such as trap, string and flask. They will also be able to read and spell some polysyllabic words.

In Phase Five, children will learn more graphemes and phonemes. For example, they already know ai as in rain, but now they will be introduced to ay as in day and a-e as in make.

Alternative pronunciations for graphemes will also be introduced, e.g. ea in tea, head and break.

 

Below are some links to websites that have some fun phonics games to play and resources that you may find useful.

letters and sounds

phonicsplay